Global Economics and a Dog from Japan | The Knowledge Dynasty

Global Economics and a Dog from Japan

We live in a time of great change and hardship, but also one of great hope and opportunity. The change and hardship is easy for most of us to understand, due to the roller-coaster global economy, increasing frequency of natural disasters, and the myriad wars and unrest going on around the world. So where does hope and opportunity fit in?

Let’s look at the earthquake and subsequent nuclear disaster that recently occurred in Fukushima, Japan. When the nuclear reactors began to fail and explode, huge amounts of radiation were released into the air. For miles, the area was deemed uninhabitable and unsafe for any living being. Residents were evacuated, but many were forced to leave their pets behind.

What has become of these lost pets? They are struggling to survive, alone, day to day. Water and food are scarce if available at all. Each day more of these pets lose their fight for life. This is where hope and opportunity come in.

Remember the story of Hachi? It is about the unbreakable bond of loyalty and love between a dog and his master. Hachiko’s actions are compelled by a level of fidelity nearly incomprehensible to most people, but for a dog perhaps not so surprising. He waits eagerly at the train station each day for his master’s return from work and it is clear that his master feels the same enthusiastic anticipation at these daily reunions. One day his master does not return. He has in fact passed away and will never return. Hachiko remains at the station, day after day, year after year, dutifully waiting. Bystanders are amazed by Hachiko’s loyalty and saddened by his plight. They even try to explain what happened, but how do you communicate such an idea to a dog? Only after his own death, years later, does Hachiko go home. The dog and his master are finally reunited.

Vicki Wong, a passionate pet advocate produced the film version of Hachiko’s story, Hachi: A Dogs Tale. “I made the film to promote compassion and respect for all animals,” says Ms. Wong. Like Hachiko, the left-behind pets of Fukushima don’t understand the tragedy that has happened or why they have been left behind. They simply wait for their masters to return, many dying in the meantime.

“Imagine your pet without food or water for even one day,” urges Ms. Wong. “These sweet animals are clinging to life. They haven’t lost hope in us, let’s not let them down.” Along with The Hachiko Coalition, Ms. Wong is working to find and care for these lost pets until they can be reunited with their masters, but time is their enemy. They need our help now.

Out of strife comes opportunity and hope. Here is our chance to turn the bad news of the world into something good. Like the bystanders helped Hachiko as much as they could, won’t you help the lost pets of Fukushima?

For more information and to donate to The Hachiko Coalition, please visit:http://www.vickiwongandhachi.com/

Only after his own death, years later, does Hachiko go home. Vicki Wong, a passionate pet advocate produced the film version of Hachiko’s story,For more information and to donate to The Hachiko Coalition, please visit:http://www.vickiwongandhachi.com/
 

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