Ophelia, Gertrude, and Regicide – Hamlet II: Crash Course Literature 204 | The Knowledge Dynasty

Ophelia, Gertrude, and Regicide – Hamlet II: Crash Course Literature 204

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25 Responses to Ophelia, Gertrude, and Regicide – Hamlet II: Crash Course Literature 204

  • CrashCourse says:

    In which +John Green teaches you MORE about Bill Shakespeare’s Hamlet.
    John talks about gender roles in Hamlet, and what kind of power and agency
    Ophelia and Gertrude had, if they had any at all (spoiler alert: we think
    they did). You’ll also learn about regicide, Ophelia’s flowers, and
    Hamlet’s potential motivations. Also, Oedipus comes up again, but we don’t
    buy it.

    Ophelia, Gertrude, and Regicide – Hamlet II: Crash Course Literature 204´╗┐

  • james nelson says:

    John Green, would you please do Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch
    Albom? I love this book and would love to have you collaborate and such
    about it. ­čÖé ´╗┐

  • Gator W.F. says:

    The saddest thing about our own opinions is that we believe them more than
    listening to others. We never look at it from their perspective or notice
    their reasons behind it. We judge and are judgmental by passing it on.
    Better yet we are kind of prejudice and equally guilty as those who judge
    us back. But why do we pass it on as if it is natural? ” Its fine I guess”
    But here is the bottom line. You know what you know, and I know what I
    know. But you don’t know what I know, because you are not me, and will
    never be. – In my opinion, ALWAYS STAY AWESOME!!´╗┐

  • NoahFanForever says:

    when will John do Canadian History´╗┐

  • Harini Pasupuleti says:

    Is there any sin or crime Ophelia committs?´╗┐

  • jasmine wilson says:

    Man why couldn’t John be my English teacher! Hamlet has always been my fav
    Shakespeare play and this makes me like it even more and really understand
    it better!! ´╗┐

  • The Moon says:

    There are no heroes in Hamlet, just real people.´╗┐

  • Summer Flake says:

    “I will, my lord. I pray you pardon me.”
    “IS SHE JUST THIRSTY?”
    thank you.´╗┐

  • reghin79 says:

    Hy, nice presentation. Could you recommend some reading material on the
    topic of madness as portrayed in Hamlet ? Thanks.´╗┐

  • shellsamurai says:

    Why does Hamlet die after Laertes, even though Hamlet is stabbed with the
    poisoned sword before Laertes? That doesnt make sense´╗┐

  • Rachel Gottschalk says:

    An individual’s view of heroism, much like his or her view on revenge,
    depends on the background and interactions of that individual. This makes
    labeling a person with any noticeable flaws as a hero virtually impossible,
    or at least makes any agreement unattainable. Which attributes define a
    hero, and what does it take to overrule the morally ambiguous thoughts or
    operations that the “hero” may have? This play acts to shine light on
    humanity and the effects of simply being human, as was mentioned in the
    video. Can a classical hero ever afford to be human?´╗┐

  • OuroborosChoked says:

    “Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem” is a platitude
    used by people who’ve never had any real problems or never considered
    suicide themselves.

    Way to pass judgement on people in the cold, bitter grip of despair, John.
    Bravo, you middle class white straight non-transgendered male with multiple
    YouTube channels and thousands of followers. Such a hard life you lead…
    such compassion.´╗┐

  • juliawold77 says:

    *whispers* Ophelia was totally pregnant ´╗┐

  • The Rugged Pyrrhus says:

    I just made a video analyzing the character of Claudius. I hope that it
    will help some of you students preparing for tests and writing essays!´╗┐

  • acecat2798 says:

    I feel like Ophelia is the Hamlet who was decisive, who took paths of her
    own, and maybe made some wrong choices but made the choices just the same.
    She, like Hamlet (I believe) faked her madness to be allowed to speak
    truth, similar to how court fools would feign stupidity to deliver biting
    commentary without retribution (something Shakespeare had quite often in
    his plays: see Feste and Touchstone for good examples) and, once she had
    said her peace, was ready to die and be done with it, because she couldn’t
    wait around any longer for action, and frankly could not listen to the
    others’ heresy anymore. Gertrude saw her death not for what it was but
    rather what she wanted it to be: an accident by a madwoman, not a direct
    death by a person (arguably) far braver than she was (up until the final
    scene) who confronted her problems head-on.
    That said, I find Ophelia a tragic character, in that none of this had to
    have happened to her. She could’ve gone through her life unaffected by
    tragedy until someone did act, that someone being Claudius, and her life
    could’ve been righted by an action to levy it (by Hamlet or Gertrude
    alike). Also, she deserved better than Hamlet, whose “Get thee to a
    nunnery” is far more biting considering the Elizabethan slang of
    nunnery=brothel. As in ‘the only way anyone will sleep with you is if
    you’re employed to do it.’ Ouch, thanks, quasi-ex-kinda-boyfriend.´╗┐

  • Siddhartha Wetzel says:

    Hey John Green – I believe a nunnery was a double entendre for a whorehouse
    – he’s telling her to be a whore, not a nun. Which was pretty harsh.´╗┐

  • John Green says:

    In the most recent episode of +CrashCourse, I teach you MORE about Bill
    Shakespeare’s Hamlet. I talk about gender roles in Hamlet, and what kind of
    power and agency Ophelia and Gertrude had, if they had any at all (spoiler
    alert: we think they did). You’ll also learn about regicide, Ophelia’s
    flowers, and Hamlet’s potential motivations. Also, Oedipus comes up again,
    but we don’t buy it.

    Ophelia, Gertrude, and Regicide – Hamlet II: Crash Course Literature 204´╗┐

  • Waltham1892 says:

    Telling your wife that its not the skirt that is making her look fat, but
    photons bouncing off her huge Haagen Dazs filled butt that makes her look
    fat.

    That is heroic.

    Suicidal, but heroic.´╗┐

  • Johannes Gutenberg says:

    YAAAAAS. This is great. ´╗┐

  • Andrew Joyce says:

    I just want to see a version where Seth Rogan plays Hamlet. That’s all I
    want.´╗┐

  • Freshette says:

    If you watch the Olivier Hamlet, he has a very interesting take on
    Gertrude’s impetus during the duel that is very subtly indicated during a
    previous scene (one that she is not in). Electrifying!´╗┐

  • Libby_W says:

    Can you do Othello please! (:´╗┐

  • Ryan Dawson says:

    I like this video, and appreciate popularizers of Shakespeare, but this
    doesn’t approach the complexity of Shakespeare’s intent in Hamlet. Read
    Harold Bloom’s book “Hamlet” for a thorough exegesis of the play’s enormous
    complexities. ´╗┐

  • magister343 says:

    Wasn’t fennel also used for birth control? It wasn’t as effective as its
    relative Sliphium, but it still seems relevant here if it is so near a
    reference to infidelity.´╗┐

  • Arkantos117 says:

    Backlash to discussing gender dynamics?
    Not really, just backlash to spending half an episode on why women were
    oppressed and double standards/patriarchy. It was barely relevant to the
    story and was incredibly biased, not taking into account a variety of other
    things. The way stuff was interpreted showed no consideration for any
    reasoning other than ‘sexism’.
    That aside, good ep, this was handled a lot better than the Odyssey.´╗┐

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